Last edited by Sagrel
Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

3 edition of Swollen-thorn acacias of Central America found in the catalog.

Swollen-thorn acacias of Central America

by Daniel H. Janzen

  • 355 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Smithsonian Institution Press; [for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.] in Washington .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Central America.
    • Subjects:
    • Acacia -- Ecology -- Central America.,
    • Ants -- Central America.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 130-131.

      Statement[by] Daniel H. Janzen.
      SeriesSmithsonian contributions to botany ;, no. 13
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQK1 .S2747 no. 13, QK495.L52 .S2747 no. 13
      The Physical Object
      Pagination131 p.
      Number of Pages131
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5413168M
      LC Control Number73004401

      Some plants actively cultivate ants which help the plants to protect themselves against predators. For example, the Swollen-Thorn Acacias of Central America have developed special bulbous chambers to act as homes for aggressive species of ants - which then protect the Author: Tim Tyler. Some plants actively cultivate ants which help the plants to protect themselves against predators. For example, the Swollen-Thorn Acacias of Central America have developed special bulbous chambers to act as homes for aggressive species of ants - which then protect the .

      This swollen-thorn acacia was extremely common as a result of farming and grazing practices, and it produced far more fruits than the local community of dispersal agents would eat (a thorough study of dispersal agents was not made, but at least the Plain-tailed Brown Jay, Psilorhinus mexicanus, Black- headed Saltator, Saltator atriceps, and Cited by: GENERAL LITERATURE. for Ephedra indicates an Oligocene age for the divergence of Asian and New World clades and Miocene dispersal into South America. J. Syst. Evol. Swollen-thorn acacias of Central America. Smithsonian Contrib. Bot. Janzen, D. H. Why bamboos wait so long to flower. Ann. Rev. Ecol.

      Pseudomyrmex ants have a well-characterized mutualistic relationship with swollen-thorn acacias; the plants depend on the aggressive nature of Pseudomyrmex to protect against animal predators, and the ants depend on the trees’ Beltian bodies and nectar Pseudonaja (reptile, genus Pseudonaja). Janzen DH () ‘Swollen-thorn Acacias of Central America.’ (Smithsonian Institution Press: Washington, DC, USA) Janzen DH, Carroll CR () Paraponera clavata (Bala, giant tropical ant). In ‘Costa Rican Natural History’ ( by: 2.


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Swollen-thorn acacias of Central America by Daniel H. Janzen Download PDF EPUB FB2

NUMBER 13 lCfJ km. ContOJr 1 wes atSOOO, f~et G.W'9~7 FIGURE I.-General distribution of swollen-thorn acacias in Central America, based on herbarium records, field. Swollen-Thorn Acacias of Central America. February including the emblematic swollen-thorn ant 'acacias' in the genus Vachellia This book is based on the previous book entitled.

Swollen-thorn Acacias of Central America. [Daniel H Janzen] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library. Create lists, bibliographies and reviews: or Search WorldCat.

Find items in libraries near you. Get this from a library. Swollen-thorn acacias of Central America. [Daniel H Janzen] -- In the first part, the development of a computer-based system for storing and retrieving information about botanical type specimens is described from its pilot stage to its present operational stage.

Title. Swollen-thorn acacias of Central America. Related Titles. Series: Smithsonian contributions to botany no. Janzen, Daniel H. Type. Book Material. Swollen-thorn acacias of Central America by Daniel H.

Janzen,Smithsonian Institution Press; [for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.] edition. The bullhorn acacia (Acacia cornigera), a swollen-thorn acacia native to Mexico and Central its native habitat, colonies of stinging ants (Pseudomyrmex ferruginea) occupy the hollowed-out thorns and fiercely defend the tree against ravaging insects, browsing mammals and epiphytic return, the host supplies its little guardian ants with protein-lipid Beltian bodies from its.

Bibliography: p. This nomenclatural, taxonomic, and ecological treatment of 11 Central American obligate ant-acacias (Acacia allenii, A. chiapensis, A. collinsii, A. cookii, A. cornigera, A. gentlei, A.

globulifera, A. hindsii, A. mayana, A. melanoceras, and A. sphaerocephala) and one quasi-obligate ant-acacia (Acacia ruddiae) is based on extensive field study from to and on Pages: Swollen-thorn acacias of Central America by Daniel H.

Janzen; 1 edition; First published in ; Subjects: Acacia, Ants, Ecology, Plant ecology; Places: Central America. This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. The "swollen-thorn" acacias of Central America and South Africa are truly remarkable trees.

In the wild, their enlarged, hollowed-out stipular spines are occupied by fiercely biting-stinging ants that protect them from browsing herbivores and epiphytic plants that might shade them out.

Vachellia cornigera, commonly known as bullhorn acacia (family Fabaceae), is a swollen-thorn tree native to Mexico and Central common name of "bullhorn" refers to the enlarged, hollowed-out, swollen thorns (technically called stipular spines) that occur in pairs at the base of leaves, and resemble the horns of a Yucatán (one region where the bullhorn acacia thrives) it is Family: Fabaceae.

The acacia ant (Pseudomyrmex ferruginea) is a species of ant of the genus arboreal, wasp-like ants have an orange-brown body around 3 mm in length and very large acacia ant is best known and named for living in symbiosis with the bullhorn acacia (Acacia cornigera) throughout Central America.

The ant and the acacia exemplify a coevolution of a mutualistic system, Class: Insecta. Other articles where Swollen-thorn acacia is discussed: Bagheera kiplingi: it nests in or near swollen-thorn acacia trees, which serve as the spider’s primary food source.

kiplingi is 5 to 6 mm (about inch) long and has translucent brownish yellow to light yellow legs and a dark cephalothorax (prosoma), which in males is green in the front and. Subjects: Agalinis Bentham, George, Boott, Francis, Botanical specimens Candolle, Augustin Pyramus de, Central America Chorizanthe Clinopodium glabellum Compositae Correspondence Cyperaceae Darmera peltata Eriogonum Gramineae Gratiola Gray, Asa, Greville, Robert Kaye, Hartweg, Karl Theodore, Hemianthus.

Sterilization and canopy modification of a swollen thorn acacia tree by a plant-ant between ants and acacias in Central America. as an effective defence mechanism of. of 35 results for. Outline the details of Janzen's own experiments on the mutualistic relationship between swollen thorn acacias and ants.

The main manipulation used by Janzen was to remove ants from some swollen thorn acacias and then compare the growth, survival, and herbivore populations for acacias with and without ants (See figs.& ). Swollen-thorn acacias produce yellow Beltian bodies to feed their guardian ants.

The bodies sit unharvested on this ant-less plant. (Armenia, Belize) A healthy plant with ants sees the yellow food bodies harvested as soon as they are ripe, like so: Pseudomyrmex peperi pulls a ripe Beltian body from an acacia : Alexwild.

Swollen thorn acacia and Pseudomyrmex • Ants of the genus pseudomyrmex are mutualistic with swollen thorn acacia trees • These ants are fast, aggressive, have large colonies and forage 24 hours a day • This combination results in a significant defensive response to any attack on the “home” acacia tree Adaptations of acacia to ant mutualism • Swollen thorn acacias have enlarged.

Swollen thorn acacias of Central America Daniel Janzen Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany no. 13 JAN. Systematic studies of Micronesian plants F Raymond Fosberg and Marie-Helene Sachet Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany no.

Published as part of Ward, Philip S.,Systematic studies on Pseudomyrmex acacia-ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Pseudomyrmecinae), Journal of Hymenoptera Research 2, pp.

on pages Pseudomyrmex gracilis (Fabricius ) (Fig. 6) Formica gracilis Fabricius Lectotype worker, Essequibo, Guyana (ZMUC) [Examined], Pseudomyrma bicolor Guerin.

Horticulture From Acanthophyllum Books Book Club edition. Hard covers, dust jacket. V.g./V.g. Still the most comprehensive reference work in a single volume, this encyclopedia is a 'must have' for the serious gardener.

pp. Swollen-thorn Acacias of Central America By.